Whole Grains, Please!

In my ever-expanding quest to find healthy foods that I enjoy, I've stumbled upon Bob's Red Mill's Whole Grain Muesli.

I am in love.


While I'd originally "purchased" this months ago with a free product coupon I held off on opening it.  Something about it looked delicious, yet incredibly boring at the same time.  And having never heard of the cereal before, I thought I'd wait until my interest in it peaked.

Well, I got curious. And am so glad I did!

Bob's Red Mill's Old Country Style Muesli is a hot or cold cereal that consists ONLY of unmilled whole grains, nuts, and dried fruit. It's high in fiber, protein, and deliciousness.

  • Whole grain wheat
  • Date crumbles
  • Sunflower seeds
  • Raisins
  • Whole grain rye
  • Whole grain barley
  • Whole grain oats
  • Whole grain triticale (wheat)
  • Flaxseed
  • Almonds
  • Walnuts
I was a might-bit intimidated by the uncooked whole grains in it because the only real experience I have with grains is prepackaged oatmeal. Sad, I know. I decided to take the packaging's advice and try it straight out of the bag by the small handful. Holy moly, what a perfect healthy snack! It filled me up with only a small amount and gave me energy all day long. 

Which got me thinking...why don't more people know about the wonders of whole grains? 

Most of us have heard the term before, but brush it off as some "health food" that tastes funky. Whole grains are, in fact, one of the simplest changes you can make to your diet to improve your health.  You can still enjoy all your favorite baked goods, pasta dishes, and sandwiches, but with fewer calories and TONS more health benefits.

A whole grain includes all three parts of grain kernel: the bran, endosperm, and germ.


Milled or refined grains (white flours, regular pasta, etc.) only use the endosperm, discarding the nutrients from the other layers. Research has been done that concludes that the three parts of a grain work in synergy, so you're losing out on major health benefits by consuming only one part. Scientific evidence even suggests that a diet including whole grains may reduce the risk for certain cancers and heart disease.

So what are you waiting for? Make a simple goal, like picking up a box of whole wheat pasta at the supermarket instead of your regular noodles. Make sure your breakfast cereal is made with whole grains. Switch-out one cup of white flour for a cup of whole wheat flour in your baking endeavours. Start eating healthier today!

~Sam